Avoid medical-speak

From Good Will

–Donald Kollisch

“Like a sponge,” Elwin was thinking, sitting in his father’s old chair. “The doctor said my lungs are filled up like a sponge that they need to wring out.”

He pictured a large sponge—the kind his father used to use to wipe down the horses after a full day’s work, knobby and heavy and dripping in his hands. Elwin held the image in his mind as he tried to clear his laboring lungs. Some sections were softer and more supple; others were stiff and scarred. Water was stuck in the stiffer cavities so he wasn’t able to squeeze it out. That was what made his breathing fast and shallow—the way it had been ever since he’d come in from moving the John Deere into the barn.

(Excerpted from Good Will and used with the permission of the author, published in The Country Doctor Revisited, KSU, 2010)

Elwin was a retired farmer. His doctor gave him a concrete image to understand his congestive heart failure. Avoiding medical-speak is important. Sometimes when we are new to medicine we like to use the big words to impress or friends and colleagues. When presenting to attendings and preceptors we are supposed to use the proper medial terms. But when explaining illness to patients medical-speak doesn’t work.  Translate medical lingo into concepts and images your patients will understand. That may vary depending on a patient’s culture and experience. In the above story, Dr. Kollisch was talking to an old farmer –he understood sponges and water and washing his draft horses. One of the magical moments in talking with patients is when your patient helps you identify the image that makes sense to him or her.  Share one of those moments with us if you can. . .

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