Home Visit

As a medical student in North Carolina, Dr. Fleg did a home visit with his preceptor and received a gift for his heart.

 The Sisters

–Written in Love

by Anthony Fleg

My watch said it was time to go,

But my heart spoke otherwise,

Fortunately, I listened to the latter

And went with Dr. Stuart to see

The Sisters

Miss Minnie and Miss Viola

Hailing from Georgia,

With ten scores of wisdom between them,

They spoke first, without words

Perfuming the room as we entered.

They began to tell of their aches and pains,

Joking about whether Dr. Stuart or I would be their “catch” for the day

When asked about the key to their longevity,

Viola answered, “God has been good to us,”

While their relative with them offered, “It is because they were good to their momma.”

Which caused me to pause,

Trying to shut off that medicalized, left-brain-oriented way of hearing that afflicts many of us in medicine,

They spoke not on the recipe for reaching the holy feat of triple digits,

But instead on the way to appreciate each and every day whole-ly,

as something holy,

They teach that the goal is not to reach an old age

But instead is about how to be on your way there

They remind us that the goal is not to avoid death

But to fully embrace life

I am thankful,

I am refreshed,

Dr. Stuart and I leave smiling with our minds and hearts

If someone asks me why I am late

I’ll simply say, “My teachers had something I needed to hear.”

(used with permission and published in The Country Doctor Revisited, KSU, 2010)

Many patients have lots to teach us, especially older patients, who know their bodies and themselves pretty well. One of my favorite elderly patients, a retired farmer, cannot do much on the farm now that he’s reached 90, but he takes great pride in growing tomatoes. He’s given me many pointers and improved my green thumb. Despite the pressure of seeing lots of patients, Dr. Fleg reminds us that we need to take the time to listen and connect with patients on topics beyond their health and diseases. These kinds of connections nourish us and are the rewards that come from taking care of people. If we don’t take time to bask in these, we will get burned out and cynical. What are some of the treasures you’ve heard and witnessed on your rural rotation? What wisdom will you carry with you for a while? Urban patients have many treasures to share as well. Urban or rural, have you seen interactions between your teacher and a patient that remind you of Dr. Fleg’s. Sometimes you are working with teachers who are burned out. What opportunities to interact with patients have they missed?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s